China Refused To Join Pakistan To Internationalise The Kashmir Issue
Asia

China Refused To Join Pakistan To Internationalise The Kashmir Issue

China on Friday refused to join Pakistan’s efforts to internationalise the Kashmir issue. Chinese foreign ministry said the Kashmir issue was a matter to be resolved only by India and Pakistan. In May, Chinese envoy to India had said China had “no intention” in disputes between India and Pakistan.


China on Friday refused to join Pakistan’s efforts to internationalise the Kashmir issue as a means to defame India. The Chinese foreign ministry said the Kashmir issue was a matter to be resolved by India and Pakistan alone. The remark is seen as a major snub from its “all-weather ally” after Pakistan managed to raise the issue at a recent meeting of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation.

“China’s position on the Kashmir issue is clear-cut,” foreign ministry spokesperson Lu Kang said at a media briefing in reply to a question about the OIC backing Pakistan’s call for UN involvement. “The Kashmir issue is an issue left over from history. China hopes India and Pakistan can increase dialogue and communication, and properly handle relevant issues and jointly safeguard peace and stability,” he said.

The signal from Beijing is that it would not get involved in to the Kashmir issue because it does not want to sacrifice its interests in India. Beijing’s efforts to distance itself from Islamabad’s moves came after Pakistan Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi asked the UN General Assembly on Thursday to appoint a special envoy for Kashmir.

China recently joined India and other three countries in condemning Pakistan-based terror groups. The move made Islamabad nervous and it sent its foreign minister to Beijing to persuade Chinese authorities not to take any follow-up action on the BRICS declaration.

In May, Chinese envoy to India Luo Zhaohui had said China had “no intention” in disputes between India and Pakistan.

“China supports the solution of the disputes through bilateral negotiations between the two countries,” he had said. “Take the Kashmir issue, for example. We supported the relevant UN resolutions before the 1990s,” he had said. “Then we supported a settlement through bilateral negotiation in line with the Simla Agreement.”

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